What is your oldest still operating device

Mine is a Spartus digital alarm clock! 45 years and still counting!

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I hope there’s no separate volume knob for the radio alarm, so you don’t oversleep on marathon day.

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No radio. Just have to reset for DST.

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45 years! Color me impressed.

I think mine would be my Nintendo 64, guess thats around 24 years.

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I pretty much started over when I moved to Australia 11 years ago, but I do have a Mac Mini from 2006 running as a server. I haven’t had it since 2006 though.

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I have an Atari 7800 in my basement (the successor to the 2600). It still works.

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Well I have some old PCs that could still boot, but I haven’t powered them on, so I don’t know if that counts. One of them has a Slot 1 Pentium II in it ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pentium_II_front.jpg ). There is also a Sony PS1 and PS2 downstairs that I haven’t powered on in more than a decade, but I suspect they might still work if I tried. The oldest device I have that sees any regular use is probably my PS3… and I have to admit I haven’t powered it on since Sony stopped offering free games for it as far as PS Plus subscription.

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I don’t know which is older - my Magnavox alarm clock or my AIWA stereo.

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We got our grandfather clock around 2003. It’s mechanical, but undeniably a device. My husband has wound that thing every Sunday without fail, much to my everlasting surprise.

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That reminds me… the oldest device I currently have is probably my Pulsar watch that I bought in the late 1990s or early 2000s. It has a Kinetic automatic movement and runs for months when I’m not wearing it. I don’t wear it any more as I have an Apple Watch.

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Oh, I forgot, I guess I also have an original Rio PMP 300 ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rio_PMP300 ) that I bought in 1999. It was great except that it had too little storage (64M) and it had a very poorly designed battery door that meant the slightest jostle of an older (gently used) machine would suffer a temporary power interruption and stop. I also have a 60G HD based iPod that replaced it. But again, while I am certain they both still likely work, I haven’t powered them on since the iPod Mini ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPod_Mini ) came out in 2004.

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2010 Sony Dumb 720p TV. I bought a 4K TCL 4 series in 2018 and now half the screen is dim and I can’t seem to fix it, so it’s basically out of commission. The 10 year old Sony is solid and will probably still be working in 2030.

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DUAL 1019 Turntable bought it used in 1976, manufactured in 1969 so it’s 50, ten years younger than me. The original cover cracked in the 80’s so I fit it into the modified base & cover from a dead KLH turntable.
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2nd is 40 years old, a Kenwood KA-601 integrated amplified purchased new by my brother in 1979 sold to me in 1989.
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Although I haven’t fired up either of them in about three years, so one or both could be in need of repair now.

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I’d be curious to see how those tiny mobile drives held up over the years

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Spot lights from the 70s in the bedroom.
My father’s old slide rule and his student microscope, both in working order (1940s).
Like Pommster, I left most things behind, when I moved to Germany. I do have an old Memotech MT500 computer (1984), which is still in working order, but sitting in a shop window in Stadthagen, Germany.

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Here’s an odd thing to say: I believe I still have a TI-74 BASICcalc calulator that works. (Here’s a nice pic of one: https://planet-geek.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/TI-74.jpg ) I say believe, because I know it moved with me on my last move, I remember having hands on, but I cannot currently put my hands on it :confused: I bought it while still in high school, so it would be pretty much the oldest thing I would still have working (if I knew where it was LOL.)

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Looking around, the oldest ‘device’ here is my Grandmother’s mantel clock. It was a wedding present from her work colleagues in 1938.

I’d had it for a few years, but it wasn’t striking or chiming so the brilliant Steve Fletcher who UK people may know from The Repair Shop overhauled it for us. It’s now good for another 100 years he reckons. There’s a bit on his video on how he’s now digitised this records. He knows exactly what he’s done to every clock he’s ever worked on.

So the Westminster Quarters are back. My Uncle in his 70s visited us last week, and he didn’t know I had it. Should have seen his face when it struck the hour :grinning:

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My oldest operating system- me-:grin:

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I have an LED alarm clock that I built from a Maplin kit somewhere around 1977.

A Dixons Prinztronic calculator that I bought in 1974 (still have the receipt) which has +/= and -/= keys: you have to tell it whether each number is positive or negative as you enter it.

Pride of place would go to another mantel clock, this time a Metamec electric one. It was probably a wedding present for my parents which would make it around 80 years old. It’s certainly old enough that it’s not self-starting: after connecting it to mains electricity you have to turn a “Start” knob to set the rotor spinning and this takes some practice to get right.

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That clock is beautiful.

The oldest devices I can think of that I’m certain I still have are my bedside alarm clock, PS2 and Sony TV from around the turn of the century. I spotted something that looked like my wife’s high school calculator in a box the other day, it’s probably circa 1995. I also have some old PC parts that are probably the same vintage.

The oldest things I have are my childhood lego and teddybear :blush: The lego probably counts because there are some special powered pieces I have that can be used to add working lights and sirens.

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