Mirrorless Starter Camera

I’m looking at a small mirrorless camera for my arthritic hands (Nikon D3500 feels very heavy to me now)
I’ve seen Olympus OM D E M10 Mkii (micro 4/3rds) on offer at £329 new with 14-42mm lens, Or a Sony A6000 (APS-C) with 16-50mm lens for £359
I’m going to sell my Nikon soon, it’s with Nikon being repaired, and my Samsung NX2000 is still going strong and feels real good in my hands but I want to update.
Any ideas about the above, or any other suggestions
What’s better M4/3 or APS-C

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I switched to Olympus OMD EM1 ii (can never remember where the dashes got) a year ago. Love it. For size and price I think you should go Micro 4/3.

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Thanks for your input, I’m going to get my hands on them, have a feel.
I had an OM10 in 1980 !

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I thought the Canon M200 that Ant got introduced to at CES was an interesting camera for someone who doesn’t want to spend loads. (i.e. a good starter introduction to mirrorless.) But I have to say… if you’re in mirrorless territory you’re still probably having swappable lenses and good quality glass is gonna weight way more than the camera body in a lot of cases.

Granted in this video they’re selling it as a high end web camera, but I went and looked at the info on DPReview it seems like a good basic starter mirrorless.

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Thanks @PHolder, I’ve just watched that episode and done some looking around.
Im interested in the M200, but in UK the M200 is priced at £500 so may be a stretch.
I know its new compared to the others, again I’ll have to handle the cameras to get the feel.

All great points mentioned by @PHolder about the M200. But you make an even better point, @andrewmelder. You said you’ll go hold one to FEEL IT. That matters most, in my opinion. Sony alpha series are nice, but most don’t feel good to me. So why would one shoot with gear that doesn’t feel right? Not my cup of tea.

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I can happily recommend the Olympus OM-D line of cameras. I used to be a nikon shooter (D700) and made the switch to Olympus. The system is cheaper (especially for telephotos) and lighter to carry than anything with a full frame sensor. Quality does take a small hit, but only pixel peepers will notice.

Low light performance might be the biggest drawback compared to new full frame cameras, but fast lenses are often cheaper and lighter in the Olympus system which helps mitigate this.

Hopefully you can hold it and shoot with it before having to commit to it.

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I have a Sony A6300. The differences between it and the A6000 are minor, so I’m happy to recommend the A6000. In fact, the main reason I wanted the A6300 was the wifi, but it’s so crappy that I never use that feature, so the A6000 is probably better.

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