Do you feel you're getting what you pay for from your ISP?

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I was wondering how many people feel like they’re getting a fair version of what they’re paying for… so here’s a poll… and of course discussion is to be expected below :slight_smile:

Download speeds/bandwidth first:

  • I’m getting nothing close to the download (speed/bandwidth) that I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting far less download (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting less, but close to, the download (speed/bandwidth) that I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting the download (speed/bandwidth) that I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting more download (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting far more download (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)

0 voters

And now upload:

  • I’m getting nothing close to the upload (speed/bandwidth) that I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting far less upload (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting less upload (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting the upload (speed/bandwidth) that I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting more upload (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)
  • I’m getting far more upload (speed/bandwidth) than I expected (based on the package I pay for)

0 voters

I’m supposed to get 75 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload… and I get about 40 Mbps down on average and less and 4Mbps for uploads… I’m sure that’s within their rules of “up to”, but in the poll I’d say I’m getting far less than I expected based on the ridiculous cost of my plan.

My 50Mbps down runs at around 48Mbps down, so expected with overheads. Similarly for my 20Mbps upload, I get around 18Mbps measured. In Australia, ISPs will advertise the expected speed during peak times.

I get the speeds I pay for but it’s too much.

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when testing the available bandwidth use a wired connection to the ISP modem (or your own) and disable the WiFi.

The “Up to” clause means you are on a shared local infrastructure and that bandwidth which is available will vary to the level of traffic of all the users on that shared service in your area.
To get the advertised speeds you need a dedicated connection which often offers symmetrical speeds, 25/25 instead of 25/5, etc.

Using a vpn helps keep your connection stable but it will increase your bandwidth use of using video services, I’ve noticed better stability on my connection by using a vpn and one of the ubnt edgemax routers at home and at work. though occasionally the assigned public IP stops working and i have to restart the modem from the ISP. I’ll eventually use my own. I use small packets for the udp transfer for the vpn hence the higher bandwidth usage

<Previously worked for a Tier 1 ISP>

Squarely in this camp. Considering the tax subsidies that my provider was given to build the infrastructure in my state, I feel like I’m being wayyyyy overcharged.

Just remember, test the speed while connected to Ethernet from the router. Wireless overhead will give you a lower result. When I test bandwidth on my wireless, I typically get between 40-50 Mbps. When connected via cable, I get over 100-150 Mbps.

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I use Atlantic Broadband, an ISP that serves the US east coast. I pay for 250/30 and most of the time that’s exactly what I get. Although sometimes when uploading large files the upstream bandwidth will increase significantly. Latency is higher than I’d like it to be, but I’m not an online gamer so it’s good enough.