I am sad at math... So sad

So sad. I am a college graduate - but my 7th grade son came home with some geometry homework last night… And, there were 4 problems throughout the entire math, homework worksheet that he could not solve…

He asked me for help. I spent 30 minutes on it, and even looked up things on the Internet…

I could not help him. I just finished emailing the teacher this morning - to see if he could assist my son. I explained that I tried to help him, but could not…

:thinking::thinking::thinking:

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what I find is when I help my kids (one in middle school one in high school) I can solve the problems, I remember them fairly well, but they have changed math! They have new ways to solve these things and they have to show their work. So even though I can get the right answer, the methods are different so they can’t use the old methods on the homework / tests.

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Same ! I hear ya. Today’s new math is so alien to me and those of my generation (I’m 48). SO don’t feel bad about not knowing… they uped and changed methodologies on us.

I only had to take 2 math classes for my college degree. And, I had a hard time.

I graduated college with a 3.0. And, I read faster than anyone I know. But I have always sucked at math. Even on the ACT test that I took in 1989 or so, I got a high total score. I think I even got a 34 on reading (they got rid of that section and restructured the test the following year). But, I did bad on the math section.

I can add and subtract easily and quickly. I can even do algebra with 1 variable. Past that, I am stuck. And, too many chemistry, physics and geometry problems require you to memorize a formula. If I sat in my son’s class, I could probably do it.

But, he has no textbook. So, I have nothing to reference. Just having it dropped in my lap - I cannot do it.

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When I was a kid, my dad said that the math taught when he was a kid (1930s) was different from the math I was learning. So this stuff must be constantly changing.

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that’s happened to me a time or two. It is what it is.

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I failed a midterm in university because Electrical Engineers do complex numbers in a different way than Mathematicians. I didn’t understand the bizarre way they taught it, but did it the way I was taught in math class and was getting the correct answers on assignments so I didn’t worry. On the midterm, where the prof marked instead of the student markers (who marked the assignments) I got a lot of zeroes because the prof didn’t understand how I got the correct answers. When I went to see him about it, he basically said tough luck, do it our way or get out.

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Don’t feel bad most american adults can’t do 7th grade math…

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Dude I jumped with joy and praised bajeebus when I finished my last math course in college. It’s one of my least favorite things to do.

Don’t feel bad!

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5/4 of the people don’t understand fractions.

6 out of 7 dwarfs aren’t happy.

Awesome for trying to help, outstanding for getting help so you can help.

I think I have 23 math credits for my engineering degree. It was my experience that the next class explained the magic that happened in the last one. You should take one class past what you will actually use.

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I understand fractions 1/4 of the time :wink:

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Well, you’ll do okay on this then :smiley: :smiley:

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Math was always my weakest subject. I tested well enough to place in the advanced class, but could only manage a C usually. Talk about an ego buster. It didn’t help that it was the one subject my dad was good at, and he took my mediocre performance as a personal affront, lol. By the time I got to college, I only had one required math class left, and I barely scraped by with drumroll another C. No kids to help with homework, so I’ve never had to touch algebra or geometry since, thank God.

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This is what Algebra 101 always looked like to me!

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Me too. I agree :slight_smile:

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